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Top 10 Familyllb’s Blogs of 2012

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Top 10 Familyllb’s Blogs of 2012

Well it has been another busy year for us as our blog has been viewed over 150, 000 times and we have received over 500 comments.  Thank you to everyone for your continued comments and support.

So in keeping with the year in review theme, here are our Top 10 Blog posting for 2012.

Number 10: New Proof of Parentage Requirements When Travelling with Children

This Blog examined why it’s important for parents to know that effective December 1, 2011, there are new proof-of-parentage requires for applications relating to travel by a child. These requirements are aimed at protecting Canadian children against child abduction, and designed to further enhance the security of the Canadian passport system.

New “proof of parentage” documentation required.

After December 1, 2011, for standard passport applications respecting children under the age of 16, the change involves a new requirement:  every application must be accompanied by “proof of parentage” documentation.

Number 9: Top Five Lottery Cases in Family Law

Lottery wins are a once-in-the-lifetime stroke of good fortune.   (At the least, they certainly happen less frequently than anyone hopes).  But in the case of married or common-law couples who buy the winning ticket, the joy of having a monetary windfall can quickly become tainted if they later separate or divorce, because issues often arises as to who gets the money, or how it is to be split.

So, in the unlikely event that these become relevant to our readers, this Blog reviewed the top five interesting lottery cases from across Canada.

Number 8: Ontario’s Bill 133 & Regulation for Pension Division to Commence January 2012

This Blog reviewed Ontario’s Attorney General Chris Bentley report that starting January 1, 2012, the pension division and valuation provisions in the Family Statute Law Amendment Act, 2009 will come into force. The changes are designed to make the family justice system more affordable, faster, simpler and less confrontational

Number 7: Top 5 Web Resources for Kids of Divorcing Parents

One of the most regrettable and usually unavoidable aspects of separation and divorce is the impact it can have on the children of the marriage. Even the most amicable separation-and-divorce scenarios are rife with challenges for all the parties, not the least of which are endured by the children who are the most emotionally ill-equipped to handle them. Parents may have difficulty knowing how best to support and accommodate their children’s needs during the difficult transitional period that inevitably accompanies the change in family lifestyle.

This Blog provided a list of the “Top 5” websites aimed at helping children through this phase.

Number 6: Wife Plans to Sue Ontario Family Responsibility Office for Husband’s Suicide

In the past few years, the government of Ontario implemented legislative amendments allowing drivers’ cars to be impounded and / or their licenses to be suspended in cases where they have failed to pay child support. This Blog took a look at how, according to a London, Ontario woman, this impact has directly caused the suicide of her common-law husband.

Number 5: 5 Ways to Make Sure Your Separation Agreement is Valid

Separation agreements can be a useful means by which separating spouses can take first steps toward unwinding their financial and family-related affairs by way of a mutual agreement. This Blog provided aa list of the top five ways to ensure that a separation agreement is valid and enforceable in Ontario.

Number 4: Top 5 Things to Know About the Canada Child Tax Benefit

 Soon it will be time to start thinking about individual income taxes, and all of the various components that go into providing the federal government with a financial “snapshot” for the past year.

For separated or divorcing spouses with children, one of those components is the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB).

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers the CCTB, which is a monthly, tax-free benefit received on behalf of a child under the age of 18. Its purpose is to assist families with child-raising costs, and its value depends on family income, among other things.

This Blog examined 5 things to keep in mind about the CCTB.

Number 3: Top 10 Things to Know About Children and Passports

In this Blog we examined the relatively recent changes to children and the need to travel with passports.

Since June 1, 2009 all Canadians, including children travelling to the U.S., must present a document that is compliant with the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI). For entry into the U.S., this includes a Canadian passport or a NEXUS card when available.

Number 2: Top 5 Questions About Adultery and Divorce in Ontario

It seems that celebrity gossip tabloids will never have a shortage of topics to cover, as long as there are stories about extramarital affairs by successful, high-profile celebrities. Most recently, it has been alleged that Arnold Schwartzenegger fathered a child with the housekeeper employed in the home he shared with his wife of 25 years; prior to that, Tiger Woods has admitted to having sexual trysts with at least 14 women outside of his relatively short marriage.

In this blog we examine the role of adultery and Divorce in Ontario.

Number 1: 10 Things You Should Know About Child Support

This continues to be a very popular post and is evidence of the ongoing need that parents have to for information about child support.  This blog examines how all dependent children have a legal right to be financially supported by their parents. When parents live together with their children, they support the children together. Parents who do not live together often have an arrangement in which a child lives most of the time with one parent. That parent is said to have custody of the child. This arrangement can be written in a separation agreement or court order (sometimes called legal custody), or may occur without a written agreement or court order (sometimes called “de facto” custody). Either way, the parent with custody has the main responsibility for the day-to-day care of the child and has most of the ordinary expenses of raising the child. The other parent should help with those expenses by paying money to the parent with custody. This is called child support.

There you have it.  Our Top 10 Blogs for 2012.  Thank you  again to everyone who have visited our Blog and all your continued comments and support.