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Posts from the ‘Nude Pictures’ Category

Facebook Steps in to Counteract “Revenge Porn”

Facebook Steps in to Counteract “Revenge Porn”

Recently I posted a few blogs that dealt with the criminal exposure and privacy interests that can be placed at stake when one former relationship partner decides to post salacious images of the other partner without his or her consent, in what has been colloquially referred to as “revenge porn”.

According to a recent announcement by Facebook’s Global Head of Safety, Antigone Davis, the company has deployed custom software tools in the form of photo-matching technology, to prevent users from uploading nude or sexual images of others on its social media platform.

These steps are in addition to exiting measures and policies forbidding users from posting revenge porn; if they are caught doing so (after being flagged by fellow users), their accounts are subject to being deleted. Now, according to company representatives, Facebook also intends to use computer software to identify revenge porn and to automatically match it so that images cannot be posted multiple times.

The move by Facebook may have been initiated in partial response to a Northern Ireland lawsuit by a 14-year old girl who accused the social medial giant of failing to take active steps to prevent a man from repeatedly posting nude images of her without her consent. She sued Facebook directly by way of a pending claim to be brought before the Northern Ireland court, for misuse of her private information, for negligence, and for breach of the U.K. Data Protection Act. That case is still pending.

This initiative by Facebook will also add teeth to existing legislative measures that aim to counteract the instances of revenge porn postings generally. Currently in Canada, the enactment of the Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act (S.C. 2014, c. 31) already makes it illegal to engage in cyberbullying, including posting revenge porn, and allow police to obtain information about an internet user and obtain a warrant where they have “reasonable grounds for suspicion”.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Justice Pazaratz Blasts Father for Using Mother’s Sexy Selfies in Court

Justice Pazaratz Blasts Father for Using Mother’s Sexy Selfies in Court

Recently I’ve highlighted some of the rulings by the often-outspoken Ontario Superior Court Justice Pazaratz. The decision in S. (J.) v M. (M.) is the next in line, and involves Justice Pazaratz lambasting the father in a custody battle for filing inappropriate materials with the court as part of the parties’ custody battle. Specifically, he filed sexually-explicit selfies that he had retrieved from the mother’s discarded cell phone, among other salacious images and text.

In a sharply-worded preface to his finding that the irrelevant and scandalous materials did nothing to assist the father in his interim custody determination, Justice Pazaratz focused on the impact of his conduct from the child’s perspective, and on the needlessly-hurtful approach to the parents’ litigation.

Justice Pazaratz wrote:

Do nude pictures of parents help judges decide who should get custody?

A silly question?

Why then, on this motion for temporary custody, has the Applicant father attached to his affidavit a series of sexually explicit “selfies” of the mother, retrieved from her discarded cell phone?

And why did he attach dozens of screen shots of the mother “sexting” with another man, describing her sexual preferences in graphic detail?

If the objective was to humiliate the mother, undoubtedly the father succeeded.

But how does humiliation help in family court?

How does irrelevant and scandalous information help a judge determine the best interests of the child?

More importantly — from the child’s perspective — what is the long-term impact of this needlessly hurtful approach to litigation?

a. How will this family ever heal?

b. How will the parents ever again be able to get along?

c. Can cheap shots ever be forgiven?

Justice Pazaratz also lamented the lack of decorum and privacy sensitivity by Family litigants:

Separating parents are already in crisis.  Our court process can either make things better or worse.  And our success will hinge in part on our ability to address the modern realities of technology and social media.

Between e-mails, Facebook, Twitter, texts and selfies — privacy and discretion seem a thing of the past.  These days there’s no shortage of really embarrassing stuff couples can dredge up against one another — if that’s really the path we want to encourage.

But what about relevance (never mind dignity)?

Finally, in his customary blunt manner, Justice Pazaratz summed up his impressions of the father’s “cheap shot” tactics this way:

… [W]here behaviour is neither unusual, illegal nor disputed, there’s no need to inflame tensions by attaching texts and pictures that tell us nothing we need to know.

In this case, a fundamental evidentiary issue relates to the father’s unauthorized use of the mother’s discarded cell phone.

But more to the point, the nude photographs and salacious texts submitted by the father merely confirm what I would suspect of most other adults on this planet:  The mother has a sex life.

Big deal.

For the full text of the decision, see:

J.S. v M.M., 2016 ONSC 2179 (CanLII)

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Do Nude Pics of Your Ex Help the Judge Decide? Likely Not

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Do Nude Pics of Your Ex Help the Judge Decide? Likely Not

A parent who is battling for custody of a child may be tempted to resort to bad-mouthing the other parent, or painting him or her in a bad light, all as a means of swaying the judge to rule in their favour. But in a recent Ontario case the father went too far by including explicit text messages and nude photos of the mother in the evidence he filed. The opening lines of the judge’s ruling tells the story:

Do nude pictures of parents help judges decide who should get custody?

A silly question?

Why then, on this motion for temporary custody, has the Applicant father attached to his affidavit a series of sexually explicit “selfies” of the mother, retrieved from her discarded cell phone?

And why did he attach dozens of screen shots of the mother “sexting” with another man, describing her sexual preferences in graphic detail?

If the objective was to humiliate the mother, undoubtedly the father succeeded.
But how does humiliation help in family court?

How does irrelevant and scandalous information help a judge determine the best interests of the child?

More importantly — from the child’s perspective — what is the long-term impact of this needlessly hurtful approach to litigation?

Lamenting that privacy and discretion seem to be “a thing of the past” in this era of e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, texts and selfies, the judge commented that the father’s conduct actually gives rise to some evidentiary issues because of his unauthorized use of the mother’s discarded cell phone. Then the judge added:

But more to the point, the nude photographs and salacious texts submitted by the father merely confirm what I would suspect of most other adults on this planet: The mother has a sex life.

Big deal.

The judge acknowledged that there was a back-story to the father’s ostensible justification for filing this sort of evidence: After living together for almost a decade, the mother had an affair and divulged that the youngest of their two children was likely not the father’s. Still, the court gave a clear message:

In a number of recent decisions, this court has urged parents to take a more adult and civilized and reasonable approach to resolving custody and access disputes. Simplistically, I have tried to convey the message:

Nasty doesn’t work.

The mean-spirited and malicious inclusion of humiliating and completely irrelevant nude pictures and texts in this case cries out for a stronger message:

Nasty won’t be tolerated.

The judge went on to provide a reasoned decision on the substantive issues relating to temporary custody of the children, after ordering the nude photos and salacious text excerpts to be removed from the court file. The judge also ordered the father to never show the nude photos and text to anyone else.

For the full text of the decision, see:

J.S. v M.M., 2016 ONSC 2179 (CanLII)

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com