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Posts tagged ‘divorce advice’

How To Find More Information About Ontario Family Law – video

 

 

How To Find More Information About Ontario Family Law

In this law video Russell Alexander review the different ways you can get more information about family law, including:

1. An information centre specializing in family justice

2. A parent education course for separating parents

3. Duty counsel at a legal aid office

4. A community legal clinic

5. A university law school with a student-run legal information service

6. A law society or bar association referral service for a lawyer

7. A divorce support or self-help group

8. Relevant library books and videos

9. The yellow pages, white pages or blue pages in your telephone book have listings for
many of these resources, and

10. A librarian at your public library may also be able to help you.

5 Divorce Questions: Interview of Lawyer Aleksandra Czyzowska by Russell Alexander

aleksandra-czyzowska5 Divorce Questions: Interview of Lawyer Aleksandra Czyzowska by Russell Alexander 

This week we interview Ontario lawyer Aleksandra Czyzowska.  In  2008, Aleksandra graduated from the University of Ottawa with highest distinction, receiving a Bachelor of Social Sciences with a specialization in Criminology and a minor in Psychology. In 2011, she completed her law degree at the University of Ottawa and began her articles with the federal Department of Justice.

Russell Alexander:  “How often do people ask you for advice or guidance about separation and divorce and in which jurisdictions do you practice in?”

Aleksandra Czyzowska:  “Our firm practices exclusively in the area of family law. As a result, I am introduced to a number of people seeking guidance about separation and divorce on a weekly basis. In some cases, the person has just begun to contemplate the possibility of separation, and is being proactive by seeking information about their rights and obligations. In other cases, the person has already committed to the separation, or has been served with court documents to which he or she must reply.

I represent clients in various jurisdictions, including Durham Region, York Region, and the City of Kawartha Lakes.”

Russell Alexander: “What are the biggest concerns people raise with you about separation and divorce?”

Aleksandra Czyzowska: “People are often primarily concerned with ensuring that their separation/divorce has the least negative impact on their children, particularly when their children are young. They key to ensuring this happens is to shield children from the conflict, by ensuring that both parties remain respectful to one another through the separation process, particularly in front of the children.

Secondly, people are most concerned about the expense of hiring a lawyer. While there are some ways to reach a resolution without using a lawyer, a lawyer can be helpful to ensure that the person’s transition is smooth, and that their rights are protected.”

Russell Alexander: ” What advice do you have for people looking for lawyer?”

Aleksandra Czyzowska:  “Ask people you know for a referral. However, some people might want to seek legal advice prior to disclosing their potential separation to friends and family. In this case, the internet is a good starting point (ie: Google). Once you find a lawyer you might be interested in, book a consultation. At your consultation, ask the lawyer questions, and determine whether he or she would be a good fit for you. If you are not comfortable with that lawyer, do not hesitate to get a second opinion.”

Russell Alexander: “What are the top 3 tips you have for people going through a divorce?”

Aleksandra Czyzowska:  “Remain civil with one another.
Where there are children, put your children’s interests before your feelings for your ex-spouse.
Focus on your needs, but remain considerate to the needs of your spouse.”

Russell Alexander: “What do you envision for the future of family law?”

Aleksandra Czyzowska:  “As separation and divorce become more and more common for Canadian families, there is a shift in the traditional belief that divorce and separation are by definition acrimonious processes, and that one party will ultimately end up with the short end of the stick. Going into the future, I am hopeful that with the increasing number of divorcing parties, people will move away from this way of thinking, and focus on how to end their relationships while keeping all parties’ best interests in mind.”

5 Divorce Questions: Interview of Divorce Lawyer Pei-Shing Wang by Russell Alexander

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5 Divorce Questions: Interview of Divorce Lawyer Pei-Shing Wang by Russell Alexander

In what we hope will be a successful new feature here on FamilyLLB.com, we are starting a new interview series today that will gather advice from divorce lawyers across the Canada (and beyond). The FamilyLLB blog was originally started with the goal of providing useful information and guidance to those going through a divorce in Ontario. This interview series, conducted by Russell Alexander , should help extend that mission and provide additional new perspectives to our readers. We hope to feature a new lawyer interview each Friday, so stay tuned!

In our inaugural blog interview, we are pleased to interview Pei-Shing B. Wang  of PSWLaw, who is a Toronto-based lawyer practicing primarily family law. Pei-Shing helps his clients manage difficult legal issues raised from separation and divorce both inside and outside the court system. His approach is both practical and results-driven. He is a trained collaborative family law lawyer and offers these thoughts.

Russell Alexander: “How often do people ask you for advice or guidance about separation and divorce and in which jurisdictions do you practice in?”

Pei-Shing B. Wang: “I practice in the greater Toronto area in addition to remote counties where services in Mandarin Chinese aren’t available. People ask me for advice and guidance about separation and divorce almost every day.”

Russell Alexander: “What are the biggest concerns people raise with you about separation and divorce?”

Pei-Shing B. Wang: “Most people are worried about the legal fees and going to court. They do not realize that there are options available other than going to court. It’s my duty to educate my clients and help them make the best of this difficult time.”

Russell Alexander: “What advice do you have for people looking for lawyer?”

Pei-Shing B. Wang: “Hire someone who you are comfortable with. Interview a few lawyers before you decide. You should be able to communicate with your lawyer without difficulties. For example, if the lawyer you are trying to hire never returns your phone call, that lawyer probably isn’t the one for you.

Make sure the lawyer’s professional approach is compatible with your expectations. If you want to settle but your lawyer wants to litigate, the relationship probably won’t work out well.”

Russell Alexander: “What are the top 3 tips you have for people going through a divorce?”

Pei-Shing B. Wang: “One, calm down. It’s a difficult, perhaps traumatic time for everyone who goes through a separation or divorce. The difficulties will pass.

Two, listen to your lawyer. It’s understandable that people are emotionally charged when going through a divorce. At the same time, emotionally charged people don’t make well-reasoned decisions. Part of the job of your lawyer is to offer professional and objective advice. It may not be what you want to hear, but you need to listen to your lawyer’s advice and the reasons behind it before deciding what to do.

And three, be organized. The lawyers can’t do their jobs if the clients don’t give them proper instructions. Because of the intimate nature of divorce and separation, you are expected to be involved in the process and to provide the information requested promptly. Often cases are stalled because the clients didn’t provide enough information to the lawyers to move the case to the next stage. Being organized will help your lawyer deal with your issues efficiently.”

Russell Alexander: “What do you envision for the future of family law?”

Pei-Shing B. Wang: “The courts do not adequately address the needs of families going through transitions. The overwhelming amount of cases makes it impossible. While there are cases should be adjudicated by a judge, they are uncommon. Litigation is costly, and it inevitably destroys however little trust is left between the spouses. Hopefully, with time, people will realize not even the judges can make their problems go away, With that in mind, I can see more couples approach family law issues with a reasonable settlement in mind.”

Next Friday we will be interviewing Cornwall Ontario lawyerMichele R.J. Allinotte, the founder of Allinotte Law Office Professional Corporation. We also welcome your suggestions for new interview targets! If you know a divorce lawyer with great advice, pleasesend her or him our way.