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Posts tagged ‘offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access’

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Top 4 Points About Enforcing Child and Spousal Support Payments


Wednesday’s Video Clip: Top 4 Points About Enforcing Child and Spousal Support Payments

In this video we review ways to enforce child and spousal support Orders in Ontario.

For those ex-spouses who are subject to a court order or have agreed that one of them will pay spousal or child support to the other, there are several points about the enforcement of such orders or agreements that are noteworthy, this video will review four points to consider.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Ontario Superior Court Justice Pazaratz Speaks Out Against Legal Aid Squandering – Again

Ontario Superior Court Justice Pazaratz Speaks Out Against Legal Aid Squandering – Again

A recent Family law decision by Justice Pazaratz of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice caused a stir this past few weeks. In his written endorsement of a consent order, he bluntly stated that the case before him should not have been dragged out so long, and should not have been funded by public coffers so indiscriminately. He chastised both Legal Aid Ontario and the parties themselves for “squandering scarce judicial and community resources”, writing:

After confirming that Legal Aid was paying for all of this, I couldn’t help but ask some obvious questions:

a. Is it fair for people who have never paid any taxes to be so cavalier about how they spend other people’s money?

b. Is it fair that Legal Aid has decided to fund this easily resolvable case, when every day I see people with much more serious and complex problems who have been denied any help by Legal Aid?

c. Is it fair that more important cases, many involving the well-being of children, couldn’t be dealt with on March 9, 2017 because our court was required to devote one of our limited timeslots to this case?

The balance of the decision has much the same no-holds-barred tone. And while his comments might be unusually critical and frank for a judge, this isn’t the first time Justice Pazaratz has spoken out this way.

In several prior cases he provided similar disapproval of profligate spending on needless motions and other procedural wrangling — whether paid by from the public purse or otherwise.

For example, in Scipione v Scipione, he railed against Family law litigants who run up legal costs, and then ask the losing party to pay them. In explaining that costs rulings are to be directed by an “overall sense of reasonableness and fairness”, he added that “The Rules [of court] do not require the court to allow the successful party to demand a blank cheque for their costs.”

Next, displaying perhaps a little more creative flair, in Izyuk v Bilousov, Justice Pazaratz wrote:

The popular beverage has a catchy slogan: “Red Bull gives you wings.”

But at this costs hearing, the self-represented Respondent father suggested a wry variation:  “Legal Aid gives you wings.”

He now seeks costs in relation to a 1- day custody trial … He won; sole custody.  The Applicant mother was represented by counsel.  Her poor finances qualified her for Legal Aid.   Now she says those same poor finances should excuse her from paying costs.

The Respondent asks a valid question:   Does she have wings?   Can she do whatever she wants in court, without ever worrying about fees – hers or anyone else’s?

Justice Pazaratz ultimately made the following ruling:

In the case at bar, the Applicant conducted herself as if her Legal Aid certificate amounted to a blank cheque – unlimited resources which most unrepresented Respondents would be hard-pressed to match.  A scheduled 3-4 day trial turned into 17 days, largely because the Applicant fought every issue and pursued every dubious allegation, to the bitter end.  She appeared to make up evidence and allegations as she went along.  She defied court orders directly impacting on the child, even while the trial was underway. There have to be consequences.  Either we sanction this irresponsible and destructive behaviour, or we invite more of the same.

Encouraging settlement and discouraging inappropriate behaviour by litigants is important in all litigation – but particularly in family law, and most particularly in custody cases.  No litigant should perceive they have “wings” – the ability to say or do anything they want in court, without consequences.

Returning to the most recent of decision that is now under controversy: It’s a 2017 case called Abdulaali Salih in which Justice Pazaratz simply turns up the volume a little, on what has apparently become a recurring theme with him.

To give his latest comments context: The divorcing husband and wife, both of whom had immigrated from Iraq and had never worked in Canada, were both monthly recipients of government money from the Ontario Disability Support Program. Their litigation was being funded by Legal Aid Ontario, and since they had “no children. No jobs. No income. No property. Nothing to divide.”, he added that it should be “a simple case”.

Yet the couple had repeatedly returned to court to settle even minor issues, and seemed to have no impetus to slow down the steady stream of hearings between them. In expressing his exasperation at the needless dissipation of public money, Justice Pazaratz wrote:

At the March 9, 2017 attendance, apart from paying for the lawyers, taxpayers also had to pay for the following government employees to be present in Courtroom #5 to deal with this matter:

 a. A Court Services Officer.

 b. A Court Reporter.

 c. A Court Registrar.

 d. And me.

I have no idea how much the other players in the courtroom get paid. But as a Superior Court Judge I receive approximately $308,600.00 per year. So you can see that not even counting overhead charges and administrative staff in the building, every hour of court time is hugely expensive.

Many taxpayers can’t afford their own lawyers, and don’t qualify for free assistance through Legal Aid. So they end up representing themselves in court. Or facing financial reality and settling without going to court.

But when you pay no taxes and Legal Aid gives you a free lawyer, there’s no incentive to be sensible. Why worry about the cost when some unsuspecting taxpayer out there is footing the bill?

Clearly Justice Pazaratz has an axe to grind. Does he go too far? Or is he right?

For the full text of the decisions, see:

Scipione v Scipione, 2015 ONSC 5982 (CanLII)

Izyuk v Bilousov, 2011 ONSC 7476 (CanLII)

Abdulaali v Salih, 2017 ONSC 1609 (CanLII)

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

UK Tightens Immigration Rules for Foreign Spouses

UK Tightens Immigration Rules for Foreign Spouses

In a controversial decision the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom has recently upheld the legality of immigration rules that imposed requirements on its British citizens to have a certain level of income before they are able to bring their spouses into the country. These contentious “Minimum Income Rules”, which came into force in 2012, had been challenged by four couples who asserted that they breached their basic human right to have a family life.

The rules require that, before being allowed to bring a spouse to live with them from another country outside the European Economic Area, a British citizen (including a recognized refugee) must have a minimum annual income of at least £18,600 (around CDN$30,600). The couples who contested the rules had argued that the income threshold was set too high, particularly since it increased with each additional child that needed to be supported.

This addition of a set income requirement reflects a stark change from the previous rules, which prior to 2012 had required only that the spouses could establish an ability to support themselves without needing to avail themselves of welfare payments from the UK government.

Although the UK Supreme Court’s ruling confirms that the rules did not violate human rights legislation, it also recommends they be amended, since the current incarnation does not adequately account for the best interests of the children, and neglects to consider other sources of income that the spouses might have.

This UK development is in stark contrast to the immigration policy in Canada, where applicants must prove only that they have enough income to provide basic needs for the spouse or his or her dependent children. (Although those who want to sponsor parents or grandparents are subject to specific income-level requirements and a new process for applying starting in 2017).

And by announcement made December 15, 2016, the Canadian Government has indicated that the department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada will be speeding up the processing for spousal sponsorship applicants, as part of its commitment to family reunification. Most applications will be processed within a year of a person applying.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How to Fill out a Financial Statement


Wednesday’s Video Clip: How to Fill out a Financial Statement

In this law video, Darla review the steps required to fill out a financial statement for the family court or negotiating the terms of your divorce settlement.

When entering into a Separation Agreement or bringing an Application before the Court, parties must provide full financial disclosure.

Complete financial disclosure is a prerequisite to the settlement of any family law case. The Family Law Act and its interpretation by our Courts, leaves no uncertainty in this respect. Any agreement can be set aside if a party has failed to truthfully and accurately disclose his or her financial position.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Revenge Porn: Not Just a Bad Idea; It’s Also a Crime

Revenge Porn: Not Just a Bad Idea; It’s Also a Crime

A few weeks ago, I reported on the appeal-level decision in the case of “revenge porn” where a woman’s ex-boyfriend had posted explicit photos of her on a pornographic website and showed them to his friends, all without her consent. She sued him for civil damages to compensate for the resulting humiliation.

The existence of this type of case is not unexpected, but it’s not as prevalent as one might think. Despite the widespread use of social media, and the immediacy with which even ill-advised messages can be sent, there are surprisingly few court decisions that involve a person seeking civil damages for an internet-based invasion of privacy, whether through hacking, or by posting without the person’s consent.

Part of the reason might be the impact of the criminal law: In December 2014, the Canadian Criminal Code was amended to add s. 162.1(1). The provision makes it a crime if someone “knowingly publishes, distributes, transmits, sells, makes available or advertises an intimate image of a person” knowing that he or she did not give their consent. The term “intimate image” is defined to include a visual recording, including a photographic, film or video recording, “in which the person is nude, is exposing his or her genital organs or anal region or her breasts or is engaged in explicit sexual activity”. On conviction as an indictable offence, the penalty can be up to five years’ imprisonment.

So far, there are only a small number of reported cases in which anyone has been charged with an offence under s. 162.1.

  • In R v. P.S.D., a young man in a volatile, on-again/off-again relationship with a young woman was charged after he took partially-clad images of her without her consent. He also sent the pictures to two friends, with instructions that they should save them, all with the intent to cause her emotional harm. The blurry, poor-quality photos were taken with his cellphone, in a manner that clearly indicated she had not consented, and showed portions of the woman’s bare breasts. The man was given a suspended sentence, after being given 90 days’ enhanced credit for the 60 days he spent in pre-trial custody.
  • In v. Calpito, the male accused, in his early 20s, confessed to having posted seven nude photos of his former girlfriend on Instagram after their romantic relationship had ended.  The photos were viewed by the woman’s large circle of friends, and even by her employer. The woman described the devastating effect of his actions on her life and university studies. The man was sentenced to a conditional discharge with three years’ probation, together with restrictions on his internet use and a significant term of community service.

The enactment of this new criminal offence, with its potentially hefty sentence, has surely had a chilling effect on the need for civil remedies as well. It means that Canadian law is well-poised to thwart the impulses of spurned ex-lovers to wreak revenge on former partners by oversharing intimate images.

For the full text of the decisions, see:

R v. P.S.D., 2016 BCPC 400 (CanLII)

v. Calpito, 2017 ONCJ 129, 2017 CarswellOnt 340

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Regret is No Excuse for Disobeying Consent Order: Mom Blocks Grandmother’s Access to Kid

Regret is No Excuse for Disobeying Consent Order: Mom Blocks Grandmother’s Access to Kid

In some Family Law cases, one can speculate about the good intentions behind a parent’s actions, even when they end up being contrary to an agreement with the other parent, or to a court order. Still, it behooves the court to enforce its prior orders and agreements, to maintain the semblance of fairness and respect for the judicial process.

This was the situation in a case called Perna v Foss. The mother and father had married only a month before their child was born, and separated 18 months later.   The father eventually agreed to give sole custody to the mother.

When the boy was around 7 years old, the mother agreed to allow the boy’s grandmother (on the father’s side) to have access to him one day a week. In view of the mother’s acquiescence, the court granted a consent order accordingly.

However, the mother stopped facilitating the access altogether when she formed the opinion that the grandmother was “having conversations with [the boy] regarding serious issues” during those visits. She explained her move to block access in texts and Skype conversations with the grandmother, one of which read as follows:

I will consider giving you ur (sic) time back if u can promise me only good times and no conversations w Jackson about moving or living in Dominican Republic. I want the pressure off of him completely.  I never said I wanted you out of his life Sandra.  I just don’t want him having to answer questions about how he showers or what mommy does.  It’s not fair.  If you agree to this we can start visits again.  …

Evidently the two women were unable to come to an understanding; the mother continued to deny access, which prompted the grandmother to bring a motion for a court order finding her in contempt. The mother ignored the motion, and did not appear in court. (Nor had she taken any steps to vary the initial consent order granting the grandmother access in the first place, which would have been the ordinary course to take if she now took issue with it).

The court considered the circumstances, and agreed that the mother should indeed be held in contempt.

She was clearly aware of the consent order, and could not claim to be confused about its interpretation. She freely admitted to disobeying it on more than one occasion, as her texts and Skype sessions showed. In fact, she had announced both her deliberate intent to block the grandmother’s access, and her reasons for doing so.

The court speculated that the mother perhaps regretted having agreed to giving the grandmother access in the first place, but this did not give her justification or excuse for failing to honour her obligations under the consent order. She did not have the right to unilaterally refuse to comply.

In light of the contempt finding, the court refused to hear any further motions by the mothers – including one she had brought recently for permission to remain in the Dominican Republic with the child – until the contempt was purged.

For the full text of the decision, see:

Perna v Foss, 2015 ONSC 5636 (CanLII)

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Top 5 questions about spousal support in Ontario, Canada


Wednesday’s Video Clip: Top 5 questions about spousal support in Ontario, Canada

In this video we review some of the more common questions about spousal support in Ontario, including:

1) What is spousal support?

Spousal support — which is sometimes called “alimony” — is money paid from one spouse to the other after the dissolution of the relationship. The obligation to pay spousal support is a legal one, and may arise either from a marriage, or from a common-law relationship.

2) What is the legal basis for obtaining spousal support?

The obligation for one spouse to pay spousal support to the other does not arise automatically from the fact that the parties had a relationship together (whether formally married or common law). Rather, the spouse who is claiming spousal support must prove an entitlement to it.

A court may order spousal support, and will set an amount and duration based on various factors that exist between the parties. The jurisdiction for a court to award spousal support comes from either the federal Divorce Act (as part of a divorce order), or from the Ontario Family Law Act.

3) What factors dictate the duration and amount of spousal support?

The determination of how much support a spouse should receive, and for how long, is a complex equation. In making a spousal support order courts consider several factors, including:

• the length of the entire relationship (including time living together before marriage);

• the financial circumstances of each spouse, both during the relationship and
after separation;

• the functions performed by each spouse during the relationship;

• the financial repercussions or detrimental financial effect on one or both spouses of caring for each other or for any children of the relationship; and

• each spouse’s ability to support him or herself.

In some cases one spouse may have suffered a financial loss or disadvantage as result of joint career and lifestyle decisions made during the marriage or relationship (for example the decision to move the family so that a spouse can take a new job, or that the mother will give up her career to stay home and raise the children). A disadvantaged spouse will be entitled to support to compensate him or her for that setback.

There may also be a limit on the duration of the support that one spouse receives from the other, as means of encouraging the recipient spouse to achieve post-separation financial independence as quickly as possible. Alternatively, the order may contain a built-in review mechanism.

Note that there are certain tax consequences relating to spousal support — both from the payor’s and the recipient’s perspective. In short — and provided it is paid pursuant to either a written separation agreement or a court order — it is considered “taxable income” in the hands of the spouse who receives it, and is deductible from the taxable income of the spouse who pays it. These tax ramifications are taken into account when determining the amount of support.

4) How does the spouse’s behaviour affect spousal support entitlement?

Generally speaking, the entitlement to spousal support is not dependent on the spouse’s pre- or post-separation behaviour, morality, or ethical conduct. In other words, a spouse who is otherwise entitled to spousal support after the dissolution of a marriage will not become disentitled because he or she was violent, or because it is later discovered that he or she had an extra-marital affair during the marriage.
Having said that, a court’s determination of the amount and duration of spousal support will hinge upon each party providing forthright, comprehensive financial disclosure to each other. If in making the determination the court feels that one spouse has withheld financial information (e.g. has failed to disclose a source of significant income), the court may impute income to the spouse and award the other spouse his or her support accordingly.

5) What happens if there is a change in circumstances?

As indicated above, the notion of one spouse receiving spousal support from the other is rooted in several concepts and principles, including:

1) the financial disadvantage or dependence that relationship gave rise to must be redressed post-separation; and

2) the ability of the paying spouse to fund the spousal support award must be taken into account.

The amount or duration of spousal support may have to be adjusted if there is significant change in the financial circumstances of either party. This change must be significant, and must not have been foreseen when the separation agreement or the court-ordered spousal support award was made.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Should Pacemaker Evidence Be Used to Catch Cheaters?

Should Pacemaker Evidence Be Used to Catch Cheaters?

I have written several times before about some of the more novel uses of the information that can be gleaned from social media, for example the use in Family Law of evidence taken from Facebook. Some of our previous posts include: Facebook as a Source of Evidence In Family Law: Part 1Facebook as a Source of Evidence in Family Law: Part 2; and  Facebook as a Source of Evidence in Family Law: Part 3.

The legal issue behind this kind of information-gathering, is whether collecting information in this manner is unduly intrusive into a person’s privacy.

A U.S. case reported by the American Bar Association that caught my attention recently takes the privacy question it even further: It involved the use of evidence taken from a man’s pacemaker, used to support a charge of criminal fraud and arson against him. It seems the data from his heartbeat-regulating device – which was collected from him by way of a search warrant – did not support his claim that his house had burned down. Evidently the man’s heart-rate on the night in question did not correspond with his description of events, including his scramble to collect his personal belongings and get out of the home. He was ultimately charged with arson and insurance fraud.

As the American Bar Association article pointed out, this Ohio decision is contentious because it can be seen as having “eroded” the privacy rights that an individual has in his or her health information. In Canada, the government’s ability to collect and use private information is strictly governed by the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), and this includes the right and duties in relation to collecting information for the prosecution of crime.

Although the U.S. decision has no sway in Canada, it occurred to me that if it did, the information from personal health devices like a pacemaker might eventually be exploited in Family Law cases as well.  I started to think about the limits of this kind of information, and how it might apply to divorce cases.

For example, it could be called up in support of the adultery-based grounds for divorce under the federal Divorce Act, by bolstering other evidence that a spouse who claimed to have been “working late” on a given evening was – judging by an unusually elevated heartbeat – actually engaged in an extra-marital affair. (Although I guess it might depend on how truly exciting the person’s work is!)

For now, this is the stuff of science fiction; it’s probably a long way off, before these kinds of biometrics are used as evidence in litigation generally, much less in Family Law cases. And they give rise to many privacy concerns that are assiduously safeguarded by Canadian public policy in the form of legislation.

What are your thoughts on whether evidence of this nature should be used?

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Appeal Court Affirms No Claim for Emotional Harm Arising from Birth of Unwanted Child

Appeal Court Affirms No Claim for Emotional Harm Arising from Birth of Unwanted Child

An unusual case arising from a man’s lawsuit over a baby he didn’t want has now been heard by the Ontario Court of Appeal.

As I reported here, the facts involved a man and woman who had a brief romantic fling in 2014, lasting less than two months. After going on a few dates, they had unprotected sex on several occasions. Although it was not strictly proven before the court, the man recalled his understanding, from various things the woman said, that she was taking birth control pills and did not intend to conceive a child.

But a few weeks after their short relationship ended, the man, in his early 40s, found out that the woman, in her early 30s, was pregnant. She went on to give birth, at which time it was confirmed that the man was the father.

The man, who was a budding doctor, sued the woman in civil court for over $4 million, claiming her fraudulent misrepresentation had deprived him of the choice of when and with whom to share the responsibility of parenthood. The court framed his cause of action in these words:

Although it was not presented in this way, the claim can be viewed as a tort claim for involuntary parenthood made by one parent against the other. It is clear that the alleged damages do not relate to a physical or recognized psychiatric illness. In essence, the damages consist of the [man’s] emotional upset, broken dreams, possible disruption to his lifestyle and career, and a potential reduction in future earnings, all of which are said to flow from the birth of a child he did not want. Although the claim is not for the direct costs associated with raising the child, all of the damages claimed by the [man] are the result of consequences flowing from the unwanted birth of a child, albeit unwanted only by the father.

(And it’s important to note that the man was suing for emotional harm of the non-pathological variety only; he was not suing for physical harm or for monetary damages, such as for any undesired child support obligations he may have. On that latter point, a separate Family Law suit, disputing his obligation to pay child support based on the woman’s alleged fraud and deceit, was also underway and would be heard separately).

The lower court, in striking out the man’s claim, held that his allegations disclosed no reasonable, legally-recognized cause of action, because a claim for fraudulent misrepresentation – which is a tort in Canadian law – was aimed at compensating the man for any financial damages, not emotional ones. In other words, the man was trying to claim for the types of damages that were simply not actionable through a fraud claim.

In its recent decision, the Ontario Court of Appeal agreed, adding that the woman’s alleged lie as to her being on birth control – even if it was proved that she told it – was not enough to form the basis of the man’s claim for emotional injury. Plus, any harm the man suffered was not tantamount to a “personal injury” in the traditional legal sense.

Do you think the original decision – now affirmed on appeal – was correctly decided? What are your thoughts?

For the full text of the decision, see:

PP v DD, 2017 ONCA 180 (CanLII)

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

 

 

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How are child payments taxed?


Wednesday’s Video Clip: How are child payments taxed?

In this video we discuss the tax consequences of child support.

Parents who receive child support payments under an agreement or court order made after April 30, 1997, do not have to include those payments in their taxable income. Parents who make these payments cannot deduct the payments from their taxable income.

This tax rule does not apply to continuing support paid under agreements or court orders made before May 1, 1997. The old rule still applies until the agreement or order is changed. Under the old rule, parents receiving support must pay tax on the amount received, and parents paying support can deduct the payments from their taxable income.

The new tax rule means that more of the support money received by the parent with custody is available to spend on the children. It also means that parents paying child support under an agreement or court order made after April 30, 1997, will have less after-tax income than parents paying the same amount according to an agreement or order made under the old tax rule. Courts take this into account when making new support orders.

Parents who have a support arrangement under the old tax rule may agree that they want the new tax rule to apply. They can do this if they both sign a form called “Election for Child Support Payments (T1157)”, that says they want the amount of support to stay the same but the new tax rule to apply.

You can get this form from any tax services office. Or you can call the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) at 1-800-959-2221 and ask to have a copy mailed to you, or download a copy from their website.

If one parent wants to change to the new tax rule, but the other does not, the parent who wants the change must apply to court to change the existing child support order or agreement. Parents thinking of doing this should be aware that when the court makes a new child support order or changes an existing order or agreement, it must apply the Child Support Guidelines.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com