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Posts tagged ‘paternity disputes’

Did Landlord Have Duty to Warn Woman of Fraudster Boyfriend?

Fraudster Boyfriend

Did Landlord Have Duty to Warn Woman of Fraudster Boyfriend?

In a decision called Larizza v. The Royal Bank of Canada, the court introduced the facts this way:

The [female] plaintiff … was the unfortunate victim of a [male] fraudster.  She met [the man] in February 2012, and married him in March 2013.  During the course of their relationship, [the man] persuaded [the woman] to sell her house, move in with him, and give him over two hundred thousand dollars. In the summer of 2013, she became aware that [the man] was not who he purported to be, and that she had lost the money she gave him.

When they had met online, the man told the woman he was a 56-year old wealthy Swiss-Canadian businessman, and heir to a fortune made from the Ovaltine beverage.   In fact, he was 69 years old, born in Egypt, and had been convicted of fraud on a number of past occasions.   When the woman finally confronted him about her money, he physically assaulted her, and was arrested. He was convicted of assault and fraud, and sentenced to 60 months in jail.

Their rental living arrangements while married became the focus of the woman’s subsequent legal claim against the landlord, Minto.

At the man’s urging, the woman had sold her house, quit her job, and moved in to the Penthouse of the Minto-owned building in which the man had previously rented a 9th floor unit.   That move came after the man single-handedly negotiated with Minto about the Penthouse rent and terms.  What the woman didn’t know, was that Minto had performed a credit check on the man, and finding there was “insufficient” credit information, had asked him to provide another name.  Without her knowledge, the man offered up the woman’s name and a credit check was done without her consent.  Based on her strong credit rating, Minto agreed to lease the Penthouse suite.

What the woman also wasn’t clear on at the time, was that she was listed as the tenant on the one-year lease calling for $10,225 in monthly rent.  She said she signed after being rushed into it by the man, and thought she was signing merely as an occupant.  In fact, the reverse was true.

She therefore sued the landlord Minto for damages, claiming it had a responsibility to take steps to: 1) protect her from the man’s fraud; and 2) alert her to the fact that she was actually the tenant on the hook for the hefty rent.  She argued that, based on Minto’s interactions with the man, and given his long history of fraudulent activities for which he had been previously convicted and imprisoned, Minto had a duty to protect her from the man’s fraud.

The court rejected the woman’s claim.  Even after seeing the man’s sketchy credit report, Minto did not have a duty to alert her about it in the time leading up to signing the lease.  Although Minto did have a duty of good faith and honesty in performing its end of the lease – by providing a habitable rental unit in exchange for rent – it also had no duty toward her in the time leading up to signing it.  Nor did it have any obligation to make it clear she was signing as the tenant, not the occupant.

Simply put:  Canadian law did not recognize a duty of care owed by landlords to tenants or potential tenants to protect them from third-party fraudulent schemes.  The court said:

There is no basis for a potential tenant entering into a lease to expect the landlord to protect him or her from the potential fraud of other people who will be occupants of the dwelling.  The reality is that it would be exceptionally intrusive for landlords to have an obligation to inquire into the legitimacy and wisdom of the decision of two people to live together.  This type of intervention bears no relation to the nature of the contractual relationship between the parties, and cannot give rise to an expectation that landlords would have such a duty.

The court added that even if landlords like Minto had such a duty, in this case any financial harm suffered by the woman was too remote. The court granted Minto’s motion for summary judgment, obviating the need to have the matter go forward to trial.

For the full text of the decision, see:

Larizza v. The Royal Bank of Canada, 2017

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

Court Comes Down Hard on Self-Represented Wife – And Orders $150,000 in Costs Against Her

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Court Comes Down Hard on Self-Represented Wife – And Orders $150,000 in Costs Against Her

On a recent ruling to allocate costs of the litigation between a former couple that lasted almost two decades, the court had some pointed comments about self-represented litigants in general, and about the wife’s unreasonable conduct in the case, specifically.

The court began its judgment this way:

A New Year

It is 2019, and Ian and Katherine Kirby, after 17 years, have a Final Order in their marathon matrimonial struggle.

There is one more battle to fight, however – costs.

The Judgment

The trial, more like a sentence than a sojourn, lasted ten days.  Katherine acted for herself, and she is responsible for much of the prolongation of the hearing.

Although the divorce itself was agreed upon, the court listed the many specific legal issues that needed to be resolved through litigation between the former couple.  Each spouse had been successful on some issues and not others, and some had garnered only “mixed” success.  Overall, however, the court concluded that the husband was more successful in the outcome than the wife, and that he was more deserving of costs.

The court then made some general comments about self-represented litigants:

The proliferation of self-represented litigants in family law cases is here to stay.  I suspect that there are many reasons for that: cuts to legal aid services, the self-help resorted to on the world wide web, and (let us not be so naïve to ignore) the voluntary choice by some litigants to act for themselves because they think that the judge will be forced into being their advocate.

With respect to the latter category of self-represented litigants, it is time that we recognize that there are some (not most, maybe even not many) persons who can readily afford legal counsel but simply choose to act for themselves because they think that it will provide them a tactical edge in the courtroom.  It will cause the presiding judicial official to go overboard with assistance, not just procedurally but substantively, or so goes the rationale.

There is nothing wrong with self-representation.  What is wrong, though, is hijacking the proceeding at the expense of the other side (who has counsel) and then expecting mercy from the court when it comes to deciding costs.

We do not have two sets of rules and principles for costs in family litigation – one for those who hire lawyers and one for those who act for themselves.

It then elaborated on what a court’s guiding principles are when awarding costs:

The principles apply to both types of litigants: (i) in deciding entitlement to costs, consider the presumption that a successful party deserves some costs, and consider the factors outlined in the Family Law Rules, and take into account any other relevant circumstance; (ii) in deciding quantum of costs, remember the basic tenet that the goal is to achieve something that is fair, just and reasonable, and keep in mind the prudent expectations of the parties, and pay attention to the importance of proportionality, and assess (but do not dissect line by line) the reasonableness of the time spent and the fees and disbursements charged.

The court added:

Above all, place some emphasis on why we award costs to begin with – to partially indemnify successful litigants, and to encourage settlement (even where the final result was worse than what the party offered to settle for), and to sanction and deter inappropriate conduct by litigants (even behaviour that falls short of “bad faith”).

The process by which we decide costs is not science.  It is more artful than that.  Consequently, there is an inescapable degree of arbitrariness to any costs award.  To pretend otherwise, I respectfully suggest, is a little rich.

The court then examined the spouses’ respective conduct during the course of the litigation.  In fairness, it noted that both spouses were responsible for the fact that the file languished for years and years. But it credited the husband for making greater efforts to settle without a trial, for being better prepared, and for behaving “much more admirably during trial”.

On the other hand, the wife’s conduct was unreasonable:  She made late-breaking “wild allegations” of being raped by her husband, and failed to comply with prior orders.  Even her submission on costs was filed late, after being granted an extension, and it did not comply with the court’s express directions on its length.  (The court read it nonetheless, as a courtesy).

As the court summed it up:  “She single-handedly caused the hearing to be significantly longer than it should have been” and her conduct in the past two years or so was “worthy of serious condemnation by this Court”.

It concluded that the case “out to have never went to trial,” and that “awarding to [the husband] every cent of the $190,438.63 is in the cards”.

However, the court noted that the wife is “indeed, mentally ill”, a fact confirmed by the family physician’s evidence, and surmised that some of her unreasonableness is due to her psychological issues.  Concluding that this militated against awarding the husband his full costs, the court reduced the total to an even $150,000, all-in.  Those costs were to be immediately deducted from the wife’s share of the proceeds of the matrimonial home.

For the full text of the decision, see:

Kirby v. Kirby, 2019

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Can an Ontario Support Agreement or Order Be Changed?

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Can an Ontario Support Agreement or Order be Changed? 

Yes, if both parents agree, they can simply make the change to the existing agreement or make a new agreement. The agreement must be dated, signed by both parents, and signed by a witness. The new agreement should be filed with the court where the original one was filed and then mailed to the FRO. If it is not filed with the court, the FRO cannot enforce the new support amount. If the parents cannot agree about changing the agreement, then either parent can go to court and ask the court to make an order about support. A court order can also be changed, but only by the court.

Either parent can go to the court that made the original order and ask the court to change it. The court will do this only if there has been a significant change in circumstances. For example, if:

• the paying parent’s income has gone up or down significantly

• the child has withdrawn from parental control

• the child has moved from one household to another, or

• the child has medical expenses

If the order has not been changed since the Child Support Guidelines became law in 1997, then the fact that the Guidelines are now in effect is also enough reason for the court to consider changing the order.

A change in the income of the parent receiving support is not usually a reason to change the order. This is because, under the Child Support Guidelines, that parent’s income is not usually taken into account when support is set. But there are some circumstances in which their income is considered when support is ordered.

Remember, if you do go to court to change an order, the judge will almost always apply the Child Support Guidelines. Before applying for a change, find out how the Guidelines would affect you.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Family Judge Says:   “The Guidelines are Not a Price List”

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Family Judge Says: “The Guidelines are Not a Price List”

Many of or previous Blog posts have illustrated how the provincial Child Support Guidelines, and its federal counterpart, the federal Child Support Guidelines work in various factual contexts, to guide parents and judges in determining how much child support each separated or divorcing parent should pay.

In the past year alone, we have given examples of  how special expenses such as a child’s sports or extracurricular activities are dealt with; how self-employment income is accounted for in the calculations, and even how the Guidelines are to be used to calculate child support for adult children..

What should be abundantly clear from those many illustrations, is that when the matter of child support is placed before a judge, the Guidelines are merely a starting-point for what becomes a complex mathematical calculation that takes numerous factors into account.   This is why it’s often perplexing for separating parents to try to determine what support amounts are fair, when they don’t have the help of a lawyer to guide them.

The recent case called Vidal v. Dunn is an excellent example of the complexity and number of different that this exercise entails.  As we chronicled in prior Blogs on this case, the parents had a raft of child support-related disputes between them, including the question of whether their troubled teenaged daughter’s criminal defence bills – totalling over $10,000 – were considered “special or extraordinary expenses” to be shared by the parents, and whether their 20-year-old daughter was still considered to be a “child” for the purposes of being eligible for support.

In the context of making a ruling on this last issue, the court noted that both the federal Divorce Act and the Ontario Family Law Act apply the Guidelines, and both have comparable child support objectives.

But the court went on to make an interesting observation about the nature of the Guidelines themselves:  For one thing, they are more complex than a fixed-price menu, but also not amenable to “short cuts” even by a court.  As the court wrote:

The authority to order further child support is found in legislation. The Child Support Guidelines were intended to help separated families set child support in a fair and predictable way. The Guidelines are not a price list.  It can be very complicated, especially for adult children. Entitlement to child support is a prerequisite before determining quantum under the Child Support Guidelines. The statutory path is mapped out. The court cannot customize legislation with short cuts. 

In a very recent case called Henry v. Boyer, the court emphasized the point made in Vidal v. Dunn that the Guidelines are aimed specifically at helping “separated families” to set child support both fairly and predictably.  But there are many variables in that calculation, a point that newly-separated parents should keep in mind when trying to forge the path forward towards a divorce.  It’s always a good idea to seek the advice of an experienced Family lawyer.

For the full text of the decisions, see:

Vidal v. Dunn, 2018 

Henry v. Boyer, 2018

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

On Income Tax, Support Arrears, and Retroactive Support

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On Income Tax, Support Arrears, and Retroactive Support

Income tax time will be upon us soon enough.  If you are receiving spousal support from your former spouse, you may wonder how those support payments should be treated when it comes time to file your income tax return with the Canada Revenue Agency.

The answer is straightforward:  If you are receiving spousal support from your former spouse or common-law partner, under a court order or written agreement that specifies the amount, frequency and duration of the payments, then those amounts are fully taxable in your hands.  In other words, all those amounts must be reported as “income” on your tax return, and will be taxed accordingly. (This is unlike the situation with child support, which from the recipient’s vantage point is generally considered non-taxable).

Normally, that obligation to declare your spousal support as income on your tax return triggers a corresponding entitlement by your former spouse or partner to claim an equivalent deduction on his or her tax return for those same payments, with some exceptions.

So the short answer, is that spousal support is considered “income.”  But what if the payments you receive now cover support payments that your former spouse should have made in the past?

A pair of recent decisions tackled a narrow – but important – issue relating to how: 1) retroactive support, and 2) support arrears, are to be handled for personal income tax purposes.

In a case from last year called Gonsalves v. Scrymgeour, the court reviewed the law on the tax treatment of retroactive spousal support awards (being those where the support paying spouse is newly-ordered to pay an amount that covers a past period of time during which the other spouse was eligible to receive it). The court confirmed that an award of retroactive spousal support should be reduced, to take into account the benefit of the income tax deduction that the paying spouse would have been able to claim, using the mid-point of the spouse’s respective marginal tax rates.

The more recent decision in Negin v. Fryers addresses support arrears (which are unlike retroactive support because they consist of unpaid amounts that were due under an order made previously).  There, the separated parents had agreed in 2004 that the father would pay child support to the mother in line with Guidelines amounts, together with a set amount of spousal support.   Apparently for some of the years since then, the father overpaid child support by over $52,000, and underpaid spousal support by more than $155,000.  After offsetting these amounts, the mother claimed the father owed just under $103,000 in arrears.

The father claimed – unsuccessfully – that the lump-sum gross amount he now owed the mother in arrears should be “netted down” to account for the different tax treatment of lump sum spousal support, as compared to an order for periodic support.  The wife pointed out – and the court agreed – that it was the policy of the Canada Revenue Agency to allow non-retroactive lump-sum spousal support payments to be deducted by father in the role of the support payor.  The court directed the parents to calculate the amount of child and spousal support owed or overpaid accordingly (as the case may be), in keeping with its specific directions and ruling.

Nobody loves tax time (except perhaps the Income Tax Preparers and Accountants!)  If you have questions about the spousal support you receive, feel free to give our office a call.

For the full text of the decisions, see:

Negin v. Fryers, 2018

Gonsalves v. Scrymgeour, 2017

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

 

Jeff Bezos Does Not Have a Separation Agreement – But You Should!

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Jeff Bezos Does Not Have a Separation Agreement – But You Should!

Jeff Bezos, the 54-year-old billionaire founder of Amazon.com, and his 48-year-old wife MacKenzie Bezos have decided to divorce.  The couple met in 1993, long before Jeff had even amassed his first million, and they got married six months later.

Now, those more austere newly-wed days are a long-ago memory:  Jeff is currently the richest man on the planet, with an estimated worth of US$137 billion.  He owns 16 percent of Blue Origin, an aerospace manufacturer.

We have to wonder whether Jeff wouldn’t mind turning back the hands of time to those humbler newly-wed days:  It is reported that before exchanging vows he and MacKenzie did not make a separation agreement (which in the U.S. is often called a “pre-nuptial” agreement or simply a “pre-nup”).

Since they will likely file for divorce in the state of Washington where they own a home (and which has a “community property” regime for the equal split of assets on divorce) this means that they will likely split the US$137 billion evenly.  In other words, all income and earnings that were amassed during the marriage are split on a 50-50 basis, which would make MacKenzie the world’s richest woman.

Reportedly, Jeff and MacKenzie’s split is on very amicable terms – and only time will tell whether it will remain so.  Still, the division of assets will likely be complex, because the former pair own vast swaths of land in the U.S. which may be challenging to put a value on, for the purposes of splitting it up equally.

Even though this power-duo did not have a separation agreement, it’s always a good idea to have one – no matter what your net worth is.  That’s because a separation agreement is a negotiated legal contract between you, ideally before you get married, reflecting your pre-agreed resolution to how certain aspects of your relationship will be governed in the event you decide to split later on.

It need not be limited to asset-division:  Under Canadian law it can cover other items such as spousal support, child support, as well as the day-to-day issues relating to any children that you already have.

And, because it is tailored to your unique situation and individual needs, it can be very effective for speeding up your divorce process and cutting down your costs.  The key benefit is that it can avoid altogether the need to go to court or engage in other pricier methods for resolving your disputes.  Even if you later disagree on some unanticipated issues,  a well-thought-out separation agreements can go a long way towards at least narrowing the issues between you.

Few of us have to worry about how to divide tens of billions of dollars upon separation or divorce.  But even if your assets are much more modest now – and even if you consider yourself merely a “billionaire-in-the-making” – a separation agreement is always a great idea to protect what you have now and in the future.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

 

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GM Oshawa Assembly Plant Closing & Divorce

The Ghosts of GM: Past, Present and Future

On November 26, 2018, the General Motors Company (GM) announced that it will cease allocating new product to its Oshawa assembly plant beyond the end of 2019. This came as a shock to the 2,500 employees who work at the Oshawa plant and the many more who depend on their income. While the jury is still out on whether GM will be laying off or re-training its 2,500 employees, one thing is certain—a large cohort of GM’s employees stand to lose their livelihood.

Whether laid off or re-trained, employees who have a potential, current or settled family law matter will need to govern themselves wisely to weather the impact that closure will have on their day-to-day lives. Accordingly, this post explores the likely, and, not so likely, family law implications of GM’s closure of its once thriving Oshawa assembly plant.

The Ghost of GM Past: Settled Family Law Matters

If your family law matter was previously settled by way of a Separation Agreement or Final Order, the loss of employment income may trigger a review of child support or spousal support, or parenting.

Support obligations

It is likely that the loss of employment income will mean that you cannot afford to pay child support and/or spousal support as set out in a Separation Agreement or Final Order. In the case of a Separation Agreement, you may be able to rely on a built-in review clause to revisit the issue of support. Most Separation Agreements contain a dispute resolution clause which may be the first place to start in this endeavor. In the case of a Final Order, you will likely want to bring a Motion to Change a Final Order if you and your ex-spouse cannot agree on the appropriate adjustment out of court. A qualified lawyer can assist with making this process as seamless as possible.

Parenting

It is not likely that your loss of income will impact settled parenting arrangements. However, you may find yourself needing to reduce your parenting time with the children in order to focus on finding a new job. In this scenario, you may likely need to rely on the dispute resolution clause in your Separation Agreement or bring a Motion to Change a Final Order altering an access schedule in order to achieve the desired relief.

The Ghost of GM Present: Current Family Law Matters

If you are currently going through a legal separation from your spouse, the loss of employment income may affect a number of aspects in your separation, including but not limited to, support, assets and liabilities and alternative career planning.

Child support and spousal support

You may have credible grounds by which to vary a temporary Order for support in your legal proceeding. As an Order for support would have been based on your GM income at the time, the Order may be varied by the new circumstances. You may seek such relief at a pre-trial conference or by bringing a motion. It is not likely, however, that your loss of income resulting from being laid off will extinguish your entire obligation to pay support. Rather, you may still be required to pay support on the basis of employment insurance income or imputed income. However, the extent of any such continuing obligation depends on the particular facts of your case.

Assets and liabilities

The loss of employment income may result in a budgetary deficit, impacting your ability to keep the matrimonial home. If you are no longer able to maintain your share of the mortgage and bills associated with the matrimonial home, it may have to be listed for sale—which may be the most poignant of all of your post-closure concerns. Worry not. There may be options available to you for preventing this outcome such as, a buy-out, borrowing or disposition of investments, RRSPs, RRIFs or your GM pension. However, the viability of these options to save the matrimonial home will need to be assessed against the surrounding issues in your proceeding such as support, equalization and other issues relevant to your case.

Alternative career planning

You may wish to delay your re-entry into the workforce to obtain credentials in a more stable industry. While this will yield economic benefits in the long run, your current financial obligations of support and solvency will be deciding factors. Delayed income generation caused by alternative career training may likely be manageable provided that the financial obligations of your ongoing separation are minimal. However, your freedom and ability to pursue such an undertaking may require a corresponding compromise and will depend on the unique facts of your case.

The Ghost of GM Future: Potential Family Law Matters

If you have been planning to separate from your spouse, the loss of employment income can have significant family law implications on a number of obligations arising in separation, including but not limited to, support, parenting and family property.

Child support and spousal support

It is not likely that being laid off will defer support obligations. You may be obligated to pay support if you receive employment insurance income sufficient enough to meet legislative minimums. If you do not qualify for employment insurance, your spouse may still seek support by imputing an income on you commensurate with your work experience, whereby you will be required to pay support. In either scenario, the obligation to pay child support and spousal support may survive the loss of income depending on the facts of your particular situation.

Parenting

It is likely that being laid off will mean expanded parenting time. While increased parenting time may yield social benefits, it may also impinge on your economic rehabilitation. Your spouse may expect you to dedicate your new found time to caring for young children who are not in school. These, and other significant changes to parenting time after initiating your separation, may likely hinder your re-entry into the workforce. A properly drafted parenting agreement can help by moderating unrealistic expectations.

Family property

You will have a legal duty upon separating from your spouse to avoid the reckless depletion of family property. While you may wish to list personal or real property for sale to help make ends meet, it is not likely that you will be able to freely dispose of family property after your date of separation without your spouse’s prior consent or proper accounting. You will have to be mindful of how you manage family property as mismanagement may prejudice the equalization of net family property and may result in a Court order.

Bottom line

The closure of GM’s Oshawa assembly plant in 2019 will disrupt the lives of many families, the impact of which might be felt most by those dealing with a potential, current or settled family law matter. Contacting a lawyer for legal advice tailored to the particular facts of your case is a proven way to mitigate the effects of an imminent disruption to income. While it may seem impossible to afford a lawyer at this time, there may be options available to finance the cost of much-needed legal representation.

At Russell Alexander Collaborative Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.

Did Wife’s Lawyer Know of Husband’s Asset?  And Can Court Assume Wife Knew, Too?

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Did Wife’s Lawyer Know of Husband’s Asset?  And Can Court Assume Wife Knew, Too?

In a family law decision called Anderson v. McWatt, the Ontario Court of Appeal addressed a narrow evidentiary point:  If one party is truly unaware of a certain fact, but his or her lawyer may have known about it, can a court impute that knowledge to the party?

The background facts involved a former couple who were interior designers with a successful business.  They started living together in 1980, married in 1989, and separated in 2000, after which point they became embroiled in a full 15 years of high-conflict litigation.

Part of that litigation involved apportioning the spouses’ respective interests in a commercial property in Toronto.  Just prior to their 1989 marriage the husband had bought the property, and led the wife to believe was owned by a development corporation that had been set up.  In reality, he put title in his own name only – a fact he did not reveal in his sworn affidavits and financial statements for over a decade after their 2000 separation.  The wife only learned of the true state of affairs in 2012.

The date of her awareness as to title was key:  One of the issues was the point at which her claim to the commercial property was barred under the two-year limitation period. Indeed, the wife amended her pleadings about two years after making the discovery, to add claim based in equity (i.e. claims for unjust enrichment and constructive trust);  however, if it could be shown she knew or should have known earlier, then her legal claim would be barred.

At trial, the judge confirmed that the wife herself did not actually know that the husband held title to the property until 2012, but ruled that she should have known in 2001.  This is because (as the judge concluded) her own lawyer seemed to know about it, based on some comments he made while questioning the husband in 2001.  The upshot of the lawyer’s comments was that the wife “may very well have a claim against the property” and that “We will make our claim as and when we feel we have sufficient facts to base it on.”

On later appeal, the Court of Appeal rejected the trial judge’s conclusion on this point.   The lawyer’s statement did not prove that he – or by extension, the wife – knew the husband was the actual owner of the commercial property.    At the time of that questioning in 2001 – and for the next decade – the husband had been hiding the facts of his ownership in his sworn court documents.  The wife was allowed to rely on this false information, and her own lawyer’s indication that she “may” have a claim was not an admission sufficient to trigger the limitation period. In fact, the Court found that the wife did “all she reasonably could to determine the truth that the [husband] was concealing.”

For the full text of the decision, see:

Anderson v. McWatt, 2016

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com