Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Wednesday’s Video Clip’ Category

Wednesday’s Video Clip: What is a Retainer Agreement?

Wednesday’s Video Clip: What is a Retainer Agreement?

Ontario family lawyer Russell Alexander talks about retainer agreements between client and lawyer. These agreements set out the scope of services provided by your lawyer and defines the contractual relationship between you and your lawyer.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Wednesday’s Video Clip: What are some do’s and do nots of texting during divorce?

Wednesday’s Video Clip: What are some do’s and do nots of texting during divorce?

DO text to discuss child custody and access. DO text to provide or request information that you need from your spouse. DO text to discuss the resolution of any outstanding issues resulting from your separation. DO text to engage in any other polite communication with your spouse. DO NOT text in an attempt to force or bully your spouse to do something. DO NOT text your spouse over and over again in an attempt to convince them of something you have previously discussed. DO NOT text rude or insulting messages to your spouse. DO NOT text your spouse if they have specifically asked you not to contact them or if their lawyer has requested that you don’t contact them. DO NOT text your kids any information in regards to your divorce, to ask them to pass on inappropriate messages to your spouse or to speak negatively about your spouse.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Child Support & Access Rights in Ontario

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Child Support & Access Rights in Ontario

In this video we discuss child support in relationship to access rights. A parent cannot cut off contact to a child simply because child support is not being paid.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Sharing Our Gratitude

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Sharing Our Gratitude

Our staff recognizes the value in experiencing and spreading gratitude. We often express our thankful thoughts with each other, and today we chose to share them with you! What are you grateful for? Let us know in the comments below!

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How Long Does Child Support Continue in Ontario

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How Long Does Child Support Continue in Ontario

In Ontario, child support must be paid as long as the child remains a dependent.

In this video, family lawyer Russell Alexander discusses how long child support continues and when a court, or parents, should consider stopping or terminating child support payments.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How Family Run Businesses can Survive and Thrive after Divorce

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How Family Run Businesses can Survive and Thrive after Divorce

One of the common fears of clients who own family-run businesses is how a divorce will affect the business they have spent their life building. While business owners have control over the work they put into their business and the legacy they are building for their family, they may have little influence over a relationship breakdown. The worry in regards to the effects of this breakdown on a business can cause additional stress above and beyond the heartache associated with restructuring a family.

In many family law matters involving children, the spouses are able to agree to cooperate in order to address the best interests of the children. In many ways, a family business can be used as a similar incentive: spouses can agree to cooperate in order to address the best interests of the family business. While fueling conflict is an almost unavoidable side effect of the court system, a collaborative approach is a very effective method in reducing the impact of separation and divorce on family run businesses. This process seeks to ensure that the business remains viable for both spouses, as well as future generations.

As an alternative to a purely rights based approach, other options can be considered in the collaborative approach, including:

• Family trusts or holding companies as a method of sharing income from the family business

• Tax planning, avoiding the possibility of triggering a Canada Revenue Agency audit

• Considering the formation of a new family trust

• Employment of children in the family business

• Estate, succession, and capacity planning

• Ensuring insurance is in place to cushion the effects of any risks

• Gifting shares or portions of the family business to children or other family members

• Maintaining the privacy of the family business

• Managing the continuation of income streams

• Splitting income amongst family members

• Delaying equalization or sharing business payments (Ie: if and when the family business sells)

• Preserving the family legacy for generations

• Recognizing and predicting the ebb and flow of the market and business patterns Unlike the court system, the collaborative process is unique in that it offers the additional benefit of involving neutral professionals.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How Long Does Child Support Continue in Ontario

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How Long Does Child Support Continue in Ontario

In Ontario, child support must be paid as long as the child remains a dependent.

In this video, family lawyer Russell Alexander discusses how long child support continues and when a court, or parents, should consider stopping or terminating child support payments.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Have you seen our new YouTube videos? 

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Have you seen our new YouTube videos? 

The team over at Russell Alexander Family Lawyers worked extremely hard to bring you these new question and answer videos. We’ve covered an array of topics and are excited to share this new information with you.

For more information check out our website: https://www.russellalexander.com/

Wednesday’s Video Clip: How Base Child Support Is Calculated


Wednesday’s Video Clip: How Base Child Support is Calculated

In this video we discuss how the Child Support Table in the Guidelines sets out the amounts of support to be paid, depending on the “gross income” of the paying parent and the number of children that the support order covers. Gross income means before taxes and most other deductions. The amounts to be paid are based on the average amounts of money that parents at various income levels spend to raise a child.

In simple cases, the table alone will determine how much money will be paid. In more complicated cases, the table is used as the starting point. There is a different table for each province and territory.

If both parents live in Ontario, the Ontario table applies. Also, if the paying parent lives outside of Canada and the parent with custody lives in Ontario, the Ontario table applies. But if the paying parent lives in another province or territory, the table for that province or territory is the one that applies.

You can get a copy of the Child Support Table for Ontario by phoning 1-888-373-2222.

Or you can visit the Department of Justice Canada’s web site at www.canada.justice.gc.ca/en/ps/sup and click on “Simplified Federal Child Support Tables” to find the table for each province and territory.

The table sets out the amount of support that must be paid at different income levels from $8,000 to $150,000, depending on the number of children. A base amount is given for every $1,000 increase in income, along with a way to calculate amounts in between.

There is also a Simplified Table where you can look up the paying parent’s income to the nearest $100, without having to do any calculations.

Sometimes, a judge does not accept a parent’s statement of income. Instead the judge uses an amount of income that is reasonable based on things such as the parent’s work history, past income, and education.

The judge will then apply the table to that income. A judge might do this if the parent:

• fails to provide the required income information

• is deliberately unemployed or under employed, or

• is self-employed or working “under the table”, and there is reason to believe they do not report all of their income Before the Guidelines came into effect, judges had more flexibility in deciding the amount of support.

Now, in simple cases, judges must order the amount shown in the table. Judges can order different amounts, but only in special cases. And they must use the table amount as a guide.

 

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Wednesday’s Video Clip: We’re Here to Help

Wednesday’s Video Clip: We’re Here to Help

Have a question?

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at www.RussellAlexander.com