Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘divorce’

Family Law Now | Episode 5: Top 10 Things That Might Surprise You About Collaborative Practice

[soundcloud url="https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/654829205" params="color=#101d4a&auto_play=true&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="166" iframe="true" /]

On this episode, Russell Alexander is joined by children's lawyer, Jarret Johnston to discuss aspects of the collaborative process that might surprise you.

Read more

Carolyn Warner joins Russell Alexander

We’re proud to welcome Carolyn Warner to the Russell Alexander team

headshot of family lawyer Carolyn

Joining the Russell Alexander team is our new associate lawyer, Carolyn Warner. She has practiced family law exclusively for over eight years since her call to the bar in 2011.  She is committed to providing her clients with empathy and sound advice and prides herself on approaching all cases with an analytical and tenacious mind-set.

Fun facts about Carolyn:

  • Graduated from York University in the top 5% of her graduating class
  • She earned an award for outstanding ability in oral advocacy from the University of Windsor Law School
  • Carolyn loves crime drama television series; in particular, she enjoys watching the Wire and Luther
  • Her  favorite movie is Mean Girls
  • In 2018, Carolyn travelled to Los Angeles to watch the NBA All-Star Game
  • One of her bucket list items is to hike up to Machu Picchu, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Peru

Welcome to the team, Carolyn!

Family Law Now | Episode 2: Top 10 Things You Should Know About Collaborative Practice

[soundcloud url="https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/639024933" params="color=#101d4a&auto_play=true&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="166" iframe="true" /]

On this episode, hosted by Russell Alexander with special guest Jason Isenberg, two collaborative family lawyers discuss the process, resources, and the various benefits for clients who choose collaborative.

Read more

Divorce Information Centre – New Section

chalk board broken heart game over

Divorce Information Centre announces an additional resource today titled, Separation – The Beginning of the End to provide access to information including:

Family Law Now | Episode 1: Top 10 Things You Should Know About Child Support

[soundcloud url="https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/632296365" params="color=#ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="166" iframe="true" /]

On this episode, hosted by Russell Alexander with special guest Michelle Mulchan, two family lawyers discuss everything from the basics to the complexities of child support. Tune in to Family Law Now to learn more!

Read more

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Litigation vs Collaborative Practice

Wednesday’s Video Clip: Litigation vs Collaborative Practice

What is the difference between a litigation file and a collaborative practice file?

Usually the clients find the result much more satisfactory from a cp file, as appose to having a result imposed upon them by the court in a litigation file.

What is litigation?

Litigation is a typical traditional court file. There are two lawyers involved. The parties usually take an adversarial position that involves positional bargaining. This usually involves a contested court proceeding. This results in a negotiated agreement.

What if the parties of a litigation file cannot come to an agreement?

If the parties cannot come to an agreement, the court imposes a result on both parties.

What is collaborative practice?

In a collaborative practice file, we focus on goals and interests of both parties. Again, both parties have lawyers. It is considered a respectful and peaceful process where communication should be appropriate at all times. The parties will have communication guidelines.

A collaborative practice file is likely to involve a full team. This often includes a neutral family professional and a neutral financial professional. Other professionals can also join the team as needed including business valuators and/or corporate or tax specialists.

Not only do the parties agree not to go to court, but the lawyers must agree that they’re not going to go to court; They also agree not to take advantage of each other’s mistakes.

An important part in the collaborative process is that there will be full and complete disclosure. Fairness is subjective. The goal is to come up with an acceptable result for both parties that satisfies goals and interests.

Can Husband Be Forced to Obtain a Separate Home Appraisal?

beautiful house at sunset

Can Husband Be Forced to Obtain a Separate Home Appraisal?

In a recent case called Kraemer v. Kraemer, the court confirmed two important procedural points relating to property valuation:

  • The divorcing spouse who “owns” or controls an asset has the primary obligation to obtain an accurate valuation of it; and
  • In the event of a dispute as to an asset’s value, each spouse may be obliged to get a separate expert appraisal.

The couple had been married for almost 15 years and had three children.   In the course of their divorce proceedings, they ended up asking the court to help with their disagreement over the proper value of the matrimonial home they previously shared.

The wife had had it formally appraised at $735,000.   In contrast, the husband claimed it was worth $800,000, but offered no evidence to support that figure.  He resisted getting an expert appraisal of his own.

To this last point, the court replied:

Mr. Kraemer takes the position that he cannot be required to value the home and, essentially, the value will be decided when the house is sold. In my view, he is wrong in that position.

Indeed, the husband’s (incorrect) position overlooked the core principles that in Family Law proceedings:

  • Each party just take disclosure “very seriously”, and is duty-bound to provide meaningful disclosure of asset values.
  • Each spouse has an obligation to provide credible, realistic values, including independent valuations – not a “guess” or a “fictional amount”.
  • A failure to provide credible evidence to support a value may result in a less-advantageous value being assigned by the court.

On the issue of which spouse is responsible for obtaining an accurate valuation:  The primary responsibility for establishing an asset’s accurate value on the valuation date lies with the spouse who “owns” or controls it.  This is particularly true if that spouse makes an assertion in his or her filed affidavit about the asset’s value.  The spouse then has the burden of proving the stated value is correct;  this may require the input of an expert.  If the other spouse does not agree to the value proposed, then he or she can respond with a valuation from a different expert entirely.

Having reasoned this way, the court found that the husband in this case was obliged by law to hire his own expert to provide a separate, accurate valuation of the matrimonial home.   The court also declined the husband’s requires to treat the latest valuation as a shared expense;  it noted that the wife had already paid for her own valuation, so the overall fees for both appraisals would effectively be split between them.

For the full text of the decision, see:

Kraemer v. Kraemer, 2019 

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

 

Divorce Law 101:  Which Former Spouse Gets the Half-Billion Dollar Yacht?

yacht on water

Divorce Law 101:  Which Former Spouse Gets the Half-Billion Dollar Yacht?

Upon deciding to split up, many couples have to squabble over things like who gets to keep the high-end coffee maker or toaster they received as a wedding gift.  But as divorcing spouses go, it is rare to have to argue over which of them gets the family’s CDN$584 million mega-yacht.

This was the plight of Russian billionaire Farkad Akhmedov and his former wife Tatiana.  As part of their 2016 divorce settlement – which is one of the costliest in the world – Farkad had been ordered by a U.K. court to pay over about 40 percent of his vast fortune to his ex-wife. But the ownership of the 115-metre mega-yacht called “Luna” was still under contention; when Farkad failed to pay Tatiana the CDN$795 million as ordered, she obtained a freezing order from a U.K. court in 2018 that purported to apply to Dubai, where the yacht was docked.  A Dubai court affirmed that the U.K. judgment declaring Tatiana the owner could be enforced.  Local Dubai authorities went ahead and impounded the vessel.

But recently, a Dubai Court of Appeal ruled in Farkad’s favour;  it agreed with his position that the yacht was part of a matrimonial dispute, not a maritime dispute, and that Shariah law should govern the ownership issue. Since the 2016 U.K. order relating to the yacht was ill-founded, the Dubai seizure was also improper.  The Appeal Court added that the Dubai ruling, purporting to find that the U.K. judgment was enforceable in that jurisdiction, was also in error.

It is unlikely that this will be the end of the matter: It is reported that Tatiana intends to resume pursuing her various marriage- and property-related claims in the U.K. courts.  It is also expected that the case will also be forwarded to another Dubai court for a further hearing.

Meanwhile, the mega-yacht is currently still docked in Dubai pending resolution of which of these former spouses is the owner, and under which jurisdiction’s laws.  The yacht is described as having nine decks, two helicopter landing pads, an on-board swimming pool, a mini-submarine, and space for 50 crew.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

%d bloggers like this: