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Posts tagged ‘family law’

The Family Law Limited Scope Services Project 

The Family Law Limited Scope Services Project 

The Law Foundation of Ontario recently reported that:

“A new website designed to help Ontarians with their family law needs will officially launch on February 12, at a special reception that will take place at the Law Society of Ontario.

The Family Law Limited Scope Services Project aims to improve access to family justice for middle income Ontarians by increasing the use of limited scope retainers and legal coaching, also known as “unbundled” legal services. These services are an option between full representation and no representation at all. The Project provides access to these services through the website, which includes a searchable roster of trained lawyers who are willing and able to provide such services in communities across Ontario.

The website presents easy-to-understand, step-by-step information on limited scope services and legal coaching in family law matters for both the public and practising lawyers. In addition, it offers practical tools such as checklists, flow charts, precedent retainer agreements, as well as resources and referral information for family legal services in Ontario.

The Family Law Limited Scope Services Project is a collaborative legal project funded by The Law Foundation of Ontario with the aim of improving access to family justice for middle and lower income Ontarians by increasing the use of limited scope retainers (such as court document drafting or in-court representation on a single appearance), legal coaching (lawyer assists client by offering advice, guidance and support) and summary legal counsel (scheduled lawyers provide day-of-court assistance for a fee to unrepresented litigants not eligible for Legal Aid).”

Are “Unbundled” Legal Services in Family Law a Good Thing? Time Will Tell

We examined the issue of unbundled legal services in 2012.

The Ontario family law system sees more than its share of unrepresented litigants; the option to use a lawyer for unbundled services is designed bridge the divide between those who can afford competent legal representation, and those who struggle to do so.

There remain risks that procedural and other issues that could or will arise in the context of litigation.  Further, potential problems inherent in this option may still come to light, and of course there is always the potential that disputes will arise between the client and his or her chosen lawyer, in connection with the particular scope, nature, duration and cost of the services that were agreed to be provided.

The Family Law Limited Scope Services Project website connects clients with lawyer and provides valuable information to litigants which is a step in the right direction for addressing our overburdened family court system.

Divorce Information Centre

Learn more about divorce and the Ontario Court Process at our divorce information centre where you find helpful tips, resources, videos and downloadable ebooks.

Resources include:

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

GM Oshawa Assembly Plant Closing & Divorce

The Ghosts of GM: Past, Present and Future

On November 26, 2018, the General Motors Company (GM) announced that it will cease allocating new product to its Oshawa assembly plant beyond the end of 2019. This came as a shock to the 2,500 employees who work at the Oshawa plant and the many more who depend on their income. While the jury is still out on whether GM will be laying off or re-training its 2,500 employees, one thing is certain—a large cohort of GM’s employees stand to lose their livelihood.

Whether laid off or re-trained, employees who have a potential, current or settled family law matter will need to govern themselves wisely to weather the impact that closure will have on their day-to-day lives. Accordingly, this post explores the likely, and, not so likely, family law implications of GM’s closure of its once thriving Oshawa assembly plant.

The Ghost of GM Past: Settled Family Law Matters

If your family law matter was previously settled by way of a Separation Agreement or Final Order, the loss of employment income may trigger a review of child support or spousal support, or parenting.

Support obligations

It is likely that the loss of employment income will mean that you cannot afford to pay child support and/or spousal support as set out in a Separation Agreement or Final Order. In the case of a Separation Agreement, you may be able to rely on a built-in review clause to revisit the issue of support. Most Separation Agreements contain a dispute resolution clause which may be the first place to start in this endeavor. In the case of a Final Order, you will likely want to bring a Motion to Change a Final Order if you and your ex-spouse cannot agree on the appropriate adjustment out of court. A qualified lawyer can assist with making this process as seamless as possible.

Parenting

It is not likely that your loss of income will impact settled parenting arrangements. However, you may find yourself needing to reduce your parenting time with the children in order to focus on finding a new job. In this scenario, you may likely need to rely on the dispute resolution clause in your Separation Agreement or bring a Motion to Change a Final Order altering an access schedule in order to achieve the desired relief.

The Ghost of GM Present: Current Family Law Matters

If you are currently going through a legal separation from your spouse, the loss of employment income may affect a number of aspects in your separation, including but not limited to, support, assets and liabilities and alternative career planning.

Child support and spousal support

You may have credible grounds by which to vary a temporary Order for support in your legal proceeding. As an Order for support would have been based on your GM income at the time, the Order may be varied by the new circumstances. You may seek such relief at a pre-trial conference or by bringing a motion. It is not likely, however, that your loss of income resulting from being laid off will extinguish your entire obligation to pay support. Rather, you may still be required to pay support on the basis of employment insurance income or imputed income. However, the extent of any such continuing obligation depends on the particular facts of your case.

Assets and liabilities

The loss of employment income may result in a budgetary deficit, impacting your ability to keep the matrimonial home. If you are no longer able to maintain your share of the mortgage and bills associated with the matrimonial home, it may have to be listed for sale—which may be the most poignant of all of your post-closure concerns. Worry not. There may be options available to you for preventing this outcome such as, a buy-out, borrowing or disposition of investments, RRSPs, RRIFs or your GM pension. However, the viability of these options to save the matrimonial home will need to be assessed against the surrounding issues in your proceeding such as support, equalization and other issues relevant to your case.

Alternative career planning

You may wish to delay your re-entry into the workforce to obtain credentials in a more stable industry. While this will yield economic benefits in the long run, your current financial obligations of support and solvency will be deciding factors. Delayed income generation caused by alternative career training may likely be manageable provided that the financial obligations of your ongoing separation are minimal. However, your freedom and ability to pursue such an undertaking may require a corresponding compromise and will depend on the unique facts of your case.

The Ghost of GM Future: Potential Family Law Matters

If you have been planning to separate from your spouse, the loss of employment income can have significant family law implications on a number of obligations arising in separation, including but not limited to, support, parenting and family property.

Child support and spousal support

It is not likely that being laid off will defer support obligations. You may be obligated to pay support if you receive employment insurance income sufficient enough to meet legislative minimums. If you do not qualify for employment insurance, your spouse may still seek support by imputing an income on you commensurate with your work experience, whereby you will be required to pay support. In either scenario, the obligation to pay child support and spousal support may survive the loss of income depending on the facts of your particular situation.

Parenting

It is likely that being laid off will mean expanded parenting time. While increased parenting time may yield social benefits, it may also impinge on your economic rehabilitation. Your spouse may expect you to dedicate your new found time to caring for young children who are not in school. These, and other significant changes to parenting time after initiating your separation, may likely hinder your re-entry into the workforce. A properly drafted parenting agreement can help by moderating unrealistic expectations.

Family property

You will have a legal duty upon separating from your spouse to avoid the reckless depletion of family property. While you may wish to list personal or real property for sale to help make ends meet, it is not likely that you will be able to freely dispose of family property after your date of separation without your spouse’s prior consent or proper accounting. You will have to be mindful of how you manage family property as mismanagement may prejudice the equalization of net family property and may result in a Court order.

Bottom line

The closure of GM’s Oshawa assembly plant in 2019 will disrupt the lives of many families, the impact of which might be felt most by those dealing with a potential, current or settled family law matter. Contacting a lawyer for legal advice tailored to the particular facts of your case is a proven way to mitigate the effects of an imminent disruption to income. While it may seem impossible to afford a lawyer at this time, there may be options available to finance the cost of much-needed legal representation.

At Russell Alexander Collaborative Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.

Why Do People Divorce in January?

Why Do People Divorce in January?

There are several factors that could explain divorce rate spikes in the new year and especially in the month of January. Jeremy Sutton recently reviewed  some these factors, including:

• People see January 1 as an opportunity to analyze their lives and change what no longer makes them happy. Sometimes that’s their spouse or partner

• Finances are often called the biggest challenge to a relationship or marriage. Money is always a common factor – especially at Christmas, when pockets are emptied and tensions run high

• Unsatisfactory relationships can drift along during the year, but any unhappiness is highlighted when couples spend a lot of time together over the Christmas break

• It’s sad but true that for some couples having limited time together keeps them together, and being in close proximity 24/7 over Christmas/New Year is the last straw

We examined the data behind this phenomenon last year.

Is It Your New Year’s Resolution to Get a Divorce?

January is the prime time of year for couples to initiate divorce, based on the number of court-filed applications; divorce filings begin to spike in January, and peak in February and March.   January is when divorce lawyers report seeing a spike in consultations from disgruntled husbands and wives, who at least want to do some information-gathering, by exploring the various financial and child-related repercussions that a formal separation or divorce would entail.

Apparently, those in troubled partnerships will try to keep the status quo throughout the holidays – especially if children are involved – only to formally separate or embark on marital counselling once the festivities are over. The reason for this timing is largely (shall we say) “sentimental”: People don’t want to initiate divorce proceedings immediately before, or during, the holidays. They may not want to put a pall over what is ideally supposed to be a family oriented, idyllic season of the year.   Or, they may want to delay so that the family can have one final holiday together, before they split.

For others – especially those individuals who have already started to secretly contemplate divorce, or for those embattled couples who have begun to discuss the prospect between themselves – the “fresh start” quality of New Year, and the tradition of making resolutions, may prompt unhappy partners to re-evaluate their future and finally make the break they have been contemplating.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders. For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

What is the Resolution Evolution – the Path to Peace?

What is the Resolution Evolution – the Path to Peace?

The Resolution Evolution – the Path to Peace is an OCLF/OAFM Conference and your opportunity to take advantage of world-class training close to home, to meet and network with other collaborative professionals, and to socialize with our professional colleagues.

The conference will run May 2, 3 & 4, 2019 at the Brookstreet Hotel, Ottawa, Ontario.

To register or learn more, click here.

How to Use Technology to Improve Your Family Law Practice

It’s more common than ever: family lawyers are using technology to enhance efficiencies, to market legal services, and to operate the business side of their practices. Do you know what tools and apps are out there that can help you? Are you up to date on the latest possibilities? Learn how to appropriately integrate technology to transform your practice while ensuring you comply with the Rules of Professional Conduct.

  • ​Understand how to use social media to promote your practice
  • Improve client experiences by utilizing technology tools
  • Learn how to incorporate technology through the life of the file
  • Hear about tech tips, tricks and traps

Check here to learn more or to register for the program.

This program qualifies for 2 professionalism hours of CPD.

Are Some People Genetically Destined for Divorce?

Are Some People Genetically Destined for Divorce?

Some surmise that children of divorce may experience a greater chance of divorce when they grow up because of their environment. Recent studies and news reports suggest that when it comes to divorce history may indeed repeat itself but not for the reasons you may think.

Studies and prior literature emphasized that divorce was transmitted across generations psychologically and as a result of environmental factors.

However, recent studies  “contradict that, suggesting that genetic factors are more important.”

Jessica Salvatore, Ph.D. reports that:

The study’s findings are notable because they diverge from the predominant narrative in divorce literature, which suggests that the offspring of divorced parents are more likely to get divorced themselves because they see their parents struggling to manage conflict or lacking the necessary commitment, and they grow up to internalize that behavior and replicate it in their own relationships.

[The study] analyzed Swedish population registries and found that people who were adopted resembled their biological — but not adoptive — parents and siblings in their histories of divorce.

By recognizing the role that genetics plays in the intergenerational transmission of divorce, therapists may be able to better identify more appropriate targets when helping distressed couples, Salvatore states:

“At present, the bulk of evidence on why divorce runs in families points to the idea that growing up with divorced parents weakens your commitment to and the interpersonal skills needed for marriage. So, if a distressed couple shows up in a therapist’s office and finds, as part of learning about the partners’ family histories, that one partner comes from a divorced family, then the therapist may make boosting commitment or strengthening interpersonal skills a focus of their clinical efforts.”

So how does free will and fault play into divorce in light of these findings?

In Ontario, we operate a no-fault divorce process:

Under the Divorce Act, you do not need to prove that your spouse was at fault in order to get a divorce. If the reason you are asking for a divorce is marriage breakdown, shown by one year of living apart, either of you can request a divorce. It does not matter which one of you decided to leave. In fact, the law gives you the choice of applying to the court together to ask for a divorce.
However, if the reason you are asking for a divorce is marriage breakdown because of adultery or mental or physical cruelty, you will have to have proof of what happened.

As a result, someone’s genetic disposition, as it relates divorce, will not shape the outcome of the divorce proceeding. But as Dr Salvatore’s study suggest, this information would be helpful in therapy and focusing clinical efforts on boosting commitment or strengthening interpersonal skills.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com.

Should You Have to Write an Exam to Get Divorced?

 

Should You Have to Write an Exam to Get Divorced?

A judge in China’s city of Xi’an is requiring people seeking a divorce to take a “divorce examination”. The exam results will determine if they are allowed to proceed with their divorce. It was reported that some of the questions include:

“1. “How long have you been dating? What is your wedding anniversary? How do you split the household chores?”
2. “When you were dating, what words or actions did your partner say or do that moved you the most?”
3. “When you have differing views, which of you first breaks the deadlock and how is this done?”
4. “Of the duties that you take on in the family, which ones did you do well and which ones did you not do well? How do you plan to improve?”

The exam is designed to court time and resources and also to address China’s increasing divorce rate that has jumped by 8.3% in 2016. (4.3 million couples divorced In 2016).

What is Ontario Doing?

Ontario launched the Mandatory Information Program (MIP) that requires couples contemplating divorce to attend a MIP that provides information about separation and the related legal process, and may include information on topics such as:

• The options available for resolving differences (including alternatives to going to court);

• The impact that separation may have on children; and

• The resources available to deal with problems arising from separation.

Here are some other points to note about Ontario’s MIP:

• This is a mandatory information program only; it is NOT the same as mandatory mediation for spouses.

• Spouses do not have to attend the program together.

• It only applies to spouses who are asking for something in addition to divorce (i.e. spousal support, child custody, child access or child support, division of property, and/or equalization of net family property).

• If a spouse neither contests the divorce nor attends the mandatory information session, then the other spouse can have his or her claims proceed as “uncontested”.

• If only one spouse is filing for divorce, the other spouse only has to attend a separate session if he or she contests that divorce, or else makes his or her own claims.

• The fact that one spouse does not attend a mandatory information session does not prevent the spouses from obtaining a divorce.

It should be noted that there no divorce exam in Ontario (at least not yet).

Ontario Divorce: The Basics

Married couples seeking a divorce in Ontario are subject to the federal Divorce Act, which states that a court may grant a divorce to parties where there has been a “breakdown of the marriage.” Unlike a separation agreement that can be finalized outside of court, only a court can grant a divorce. It is up to the parties filing their application for divorce to satisfy the court that there has been a breakdown of the marriage.

According to the law, a breakdown is recognized where the parties have been separated for at least one year or where the party filing the application proves that their spouse has committed cruelty or adultery. In practice, the vast majority of couples rely on the one-year period of separation as the ground for divorce.

So what do you think?  Are you ready to write an exam?

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com

Bitcoin and Divorce: Perils and Pitfalls

 

Bitcoin and Divorce: Perils and Pitfalls

We are seeing increasing divorce cases that involve Bitcoin and other crypto currencies.

This Is Money reports that there have already been several divorce cases that involve Bitcoin. They rightly point out that discovery and tracing of this asset can be problematic for lawyers:

“Tracing cryptocurrencies could be enormously time-consuming and expensive. This is, of course, much easier if cryptocurrencies are traded via an online investment platform and bought with funds from a bank account, as the original value of the transaction can then be established. When cryptocurrency is purchased directly and moved offline, it becomes almost impossible to trace.”

For divorcing couples in Ontario, full financial disclosure is the norm. So, if you own Bitcoin or other crypto currencies you will need to disclosure these assets (and their value) to your spouse. If fail to disclose your Bitcoin then there is a chance that any Court Order or divorce agreement you enter into may be set aside if the asset is discovered later as result of this non-disclosure.

The relevant date to value the asset would be your date of separation (DOS). The Bitcoin may also be exempt from sharing if you brought this asset into the marriage and owned it on your date of marriage (DOM). The value of the Bitcoin on your DOM may be a deduction to any final sharing you do with your spouse. However, the value increase of you Bitcoin from your DOM to your DOS may have to be shared with your spouse.

You should engage the services of an experienced family lawyer if you are divorcing and you (or your spouse) own Bitcoin or other crypto currencies.

At Russell Alexander, Family Lawyers our focus is exclusively family law, offering pre-separation legal advice and assisting clients with family related issues including: custody and access, separation agreements, child and spousal support, division of family property, paternity disputes, and enforcement of court orders.  For more information, visit us at RussellAlexander.com